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Archive of ‘Marketing’ category

Remarketing is Now Even More Important for Online Marketing

This blog was originally posted on http://www.rso-consulting.com and can be accessed here.

Global cart abandonment is on the rise – up to 76.8% over the last quarter, according to recent data. That means even more website visitors are deciding against purchases. Companies that want to improve their online marketing this year may need to consider remarketing as a means of loss mitigation. (more…)

5 Google Analytics Performance Dashboards

Google Analytics Dashboards are a great tool for my clients who do not like logging into their accounts. They often become overwhelmed with the amount of data in analytics and prefer to see data at a glance.

I have a previous post on how to use the Google Analytics Solutions Gallery for dashboards. The gallery permits you to use dashboards created by other Google Analytics users.  But even that can be overwhelming with hundreds of dashboards to choose from.

Below I’ve listed five of my favorites for measuring performance with Google Analytics. Please note that I did start with some dashboards I imported from the gallery and modified them to be a better fit for my reporting needs. Each heading below links to a dashboard you can automatically add to your account as long as you are logged into Google Analytics when you click on the link.

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Organic Search Performance

How often are people finding you through organic search?  With this dashboard, you can see the behavior of people coming to your site through organic search results. And yes, it probably will primarily be Google for your organic source, but you can see other sources of organic searches such as Bing, Yahoo, or AOL. You can also measure how this source impacts the number goals completed and pages viewed.

Paid Search Performance (AdWords)

Advertisers will definitely want to see how their paid campaigns perform when compared to other channels, such as organic or email. It’s also valuable to drill into paid campaigns to compare them to each other. Are visitors performing a desired action in one campaign more so than the others?  Although this dashboard is for AdWords, it can be modified to also view other paid campaigns, such as with Facebook or Bing.

Social Media Performance

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How to Use Google Analytics to Optimize Your Website

Google Analytics not only provides a picture of the good things happening on your site which include sales and lead generation. It can also point out the things that are not working well that need to be changed. Below are five steps for optimizing your website based on data available in Google Analytics.

Identify pages with the highest bounce rates

In the Site Content section of Behavior data, you can view your landing pages. View which pages are the common entry points to your site. Are those pages designed to receive new visitors? In other words, will a new visitor know what your website is about if they land on one of these pages rather than the home page? If you see a high bounce rate, it could be that it is not a good introduction for people who are new to your business and there is some room for improvement. Pay special attention to landing pages with a large number of visitors and a significantly higher bounce rate than the other pages on your site.

Analyze goal performance

The easiest way to see how you are doing on your site is to look at your goals in Google Analytics. However, rather than looking at just the raw numbers or the absolute percentages, examine what’s been happening over time so you can see if there’s been an improvement in site performance. So yes, you will still want to look at conversions as a number on it’s own, but make sure you do watch for trends over time. And give extra attention to any spikes and conversions that may be related to a new marketing activity that you started or perhaps an update that was made to your website.

General site performance

The Site Speed section under Behavior is more relevant to the website developers then to the marketers. However if you are involved in decisions about the design, it is helpful to know if an image-heavy page seems to be causing a slow load time. With short attention spans, you are losing potential customers who lose patience and visit another site. The good thing is that this is one of those problems that can be fairly easy to fix and it’s very clear-cut.

Check the Reverse Goal Path report

In a previous article, I wrote about how the User Flow through a website might not be that meaningful for many sites. If there is not a clear path through your website to reach a conversion, it is hard to know what you are measuring other than the end result. However, you may still want to check the Reverse Goal Path report to see the pages a visitor navigated before converting on your site. It can be helpful to know which pages are the common steps followed by people who eventually complete a desired action

Look for drop offs in your conversion funnel

Once you set up goals you can see how people travel through your site to complete them with a Funnel Visualization report (found in Goals section of Conversions). With this report, you can learn which pages have a high exit rate in the funnel and brainstorm ways to improve them.

Website optimization is all about using data to make your website more attractive to visitors and make visitors more inclined to complete a desired action on your website. Looking for ways to improve your site using your analytics and qualitative data such as customer surveys is an ongoing process.

And always remember that no matter how great you may think your website is, you are not the customer. If you can stay curious about what it is your website visitors want, it’s easier to get rid of your assumptions and to be more open to creative ways for improving performance. There can be room to change your overall copy, your images, your navigation, your offers, your landing pages etc. The bottom line is if you adopt a mindset where your website is not a one-time project, you will increase the ROI with the channels used to send you traffic.

 

Inside View of Agile Marketing

Do you feel like your company doesn’t understand what you do? Do you have a constant stream of requests and ideas coming into your team? Are you expected to immediately act on all requests? Do you feel like you can’t say no or negotiate? First of all, you are not alone!

What I learned

I recently instructed the Agile Marketing Boot Camp, and this is what I learned from my students. This class was comprised of mainly management-level marketing professionals that realized it was time to make a change in the way they are doing their work. The industry is changing and becoming more technology dependent. Teams are becoming more cross-functional, and marketers are now expected to have a wider range of skills including some IT functions.

The common theme with the students was that they were overworked and misunderstood. Marketing teams typically have too many stakeholders to keep up with. Within the 30 minute break, one of the students said that she had already received multiple urgent requests. If you are not on a marketing team and reading this, you are probably thinking well that’s just business, right?

Let me paint you a picture. You have 10 people in your company who each have a very important project that month and that is their top priority. Each of these people also has three or four ideas on what they want to do to market or promote their project. This is where the flood happens because these people either cannot or do not want to execute on those ideas. That is what the marketing team is for. Meanwhile the marketing team is drowning because these 40 requests have all come into the department at the same time, all marked as “top priority.”  The last line of these emails is something usually along the lines of, “Can you get this back to me this week?” Of course they feel like they cannot just say no, and then weeks go by without any progress and stakeholders become frustrated.

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Because of the nature of the marketing industry, it is more common now that executives and stakeholders are not doing this intentionally. They are simply unaware of what truly goes into completing some of these tasks. Marketing has become technical, and with that there are a lot of misconceptions of what a marketer does. I for one can’t even explain to my friends what exactly it is that I do. Most other departments in an organization don’t really know what marketing does either.

How Agile Can Help

Marketers are seeking out Agile Marketing for these reasons. They want to find a way to help their team organize priorities, utilize their resources, and manage stakeholder expectations.  Most of the students were aware of Agile from what they had heard within the IT Teams at their organization. They understand that the Agile methodology can truly be applied to the marketing industry in an effective way because of the growing use of technology and the structure of the project teams. Some had even taken some steps to start building up an Agile framework within their department. The common pain points were lack of resources and lack of communication between teams.

Over the two days of class, we focused on how to set up a structure within the marketing teams to help them organize their priorities and create a way to become more transparent within the organization. Agile Marketing is based off a foundation of transparency within the team and stakeholders. Teams are able to use data and organized planning to communicate and justify the projects they are prioritizing and give a more accurate estimate of project completions to stakeholders.

I could tell that they were truly excited to get started on what they learned in class and they were able to walk away with tools and foundations for starting to implement Agile within their teams. If you are looking for a way to find some real solutions for your team, click here to find out more about the Agile Marketing Boot Camp.

How to Optimize Your YouTube Campaigns

youtubeAfter your YouTube ads run for a while, you have access to valuable data about their effectiveness.  You can measure views and clicks as well as actions that happened at a later date but were initiated by your YouTube ad. Using these available metrics, you can measure performance and make decisions about what to optimize in the campaign moving forward.

Below are some considerations in optimizing your YouTube campaign.

Start with automatic placements

When selecting a targeting method, such as the topic, Google will select the relevant placements for you. Give this some time to run before adding managed placements to the campaign.  This gives you time to learn which types of sites perform well for you.

Remove low performing placements

After a period of time, compare your views and conversions for the different placements where your ad is viewed. If there are some placements that do not do well, you may want to exclude them from your campaign. Even if a particular site seems relevant to your business, it does not guarantee your audience is there.

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How to Create Your First Video Campaign for AdWords

More people are on YouTube than any cable segment in the United States, which means there is a huge audience there that will only continue to grow. And when you create your campaign, remember that mobile is just as important with video as it is for other AdWords ads since more than half of video views are on a mobile device.

Video presents such as a unique way to connect with the right people. Since they can like, share, and subscribe to your videos – rather than simply click – it’s a much different experience than user behavior on a typical Google.com search. With keywords, demographics, and topics, you can connect with the right customers at the right time.

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5 Frightening Myths about Email Marketing

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This article was originally posted on rso-consulting.com and can be found here.

With more smartphone users having access to their email 24/7, it’s important to understand how new consumer behaviors affect your digital marketing strategies. We’re cutting through the hocus-pocus to give you five email marketing myths and the truths you need to know.

Myth #1: Email marketing is dead.

Perhaps one of the biggest myths about email marketing is that it’s no longer a valid path to your customers. This couldn’t be further from the truth. According to Adobe’s 2016 Email Survey, people are spending 17 percent more time on emails year over year – with 45 percent using their smartphone to check work email and 63 percent to check personal email.

Myth #2: The window of opportunity is small.

Some organizations avoid email as a marketing channel because they assume people won’t take the time to read it. This is a common email marketing myth. The truth is people are spending 7.4 hours a day checking their email messages, a 17 percent increase year over year. This means more opportunity for your readers to see your messages as they are on the go.

Myth #3: Millennials only communicate via social media.

Thanks to the rise of Snapchat and Instagram, some companies only view their millennial audience through the lens of social media. But according to a study by Mapp Digital, millennial U.S. customers prefer email over other marketing channels. They are also more discriminating: only 38 percent of millennials subscribe to seven or more brands’ emails. So when you’re in, you’re in.

Myth #4: One email speaks to everyone.

Another one of those email marketing myths: you just need one type of email for all of your customers. Unless we’re talking about your welcome autoresponder (you have one of those, right?), almost every email you send needs to be segmented and personalized. Gone are the days of “Send All,” and in are the days of speaking one-on-one to your readers.

Myth #5: Mobile-friendliness doesn’t apply to email marketing.

With all of the hoopla surrounding mobile-friendly websites over the past couple of years, it’s understandable that organizations overlooked this new format for email marketing. The truth is, if your emails are not optimized for mobile devices, then they may not display correctly on your readers’ screens. Information may be missing, it may be hard for users to navigate through your email, and it may take forever to load. All of these obstacles can ruin the experience for your readers, so be sure your emails are set up for the way customers are using email nowadays.

Now that you know the myths about email marketing – and the truths – you can look at your email program as an opportunity to acquire, engage and convert customers, rather than a frightening part of your overall strategy.

6 Ways to Boost Your Business with Facebook Ads

6 Ways

Facebook is the most popular social network on the internet, and Facebook Ads is an extremely effective way to reach tens or even hundreds of thousands of people. Using Facebook Ads also allows you to take advantage of the wealth of data that Facebook collects, with advanced targeting options allowing  you to tailor your ads to audiences as specific or as general as you want. Here are six ways to use Facebook Ads to boost your business and promote your brand! (more…)

Use Cases for Remarketing Lists for Search Ads (RLSA)

When you remarket online, you are targeting someone who is already familiar with you because of a previous visit to your website. There are so many opportunities to remarket using Google Analytics and Google AdWords together, with many people taking advantage of this on the Display Network since only 100 visits to your web site are required. RLSA (Remarketing Lists for Search Ads) can also happen for Google search ads, but at least 1,000 cookies are required before RLSA can be utilized. Google states their required minimum of 1,000 is to protect the privacy of the people on your list. What makes this great for search is the ability to use a remarketing list combined with your keyword search campaigns.

The first step is to ensure remarketing is enabled in Google Analytics. Check your Property Settings, then look for Tracking Info, and then Data Collection.  Simply turn it to “on” once you get there.  If you are brand new to Google Analytics, you will want to enable this immediately even if you are not sure when or if you will remarket. Since your RLSA list does need 1,000 cookies, it may take some time to collect this many cookies on your site, depending on the volume of traffic you normally receive.

If you have been collecting this cookie data and are ready to start using RLSA, here are some use cases to consider in the context of the goals for your site.

  • Exclude customers searching for your company name. In this case, they already know about you, but forgot your exact URL. Assuming you are doing okay with your SEO strategy, you should show up on the first page for your brand name and would want people to click on your organic link rather than your paid listing.
  • Create ads for website visitors that abandoned their shopping carts.  If they start a Google search for what they almost bought from you, here is an opportunity to get in front of them again with an offer that will entice them to complete the conversion process.
  • Target people who have converted but did so a while ago. The maximum window for targeting is 180 days but can be changed. Perhaps your product is one people tend to buy quarterly. In that scenario, you would target every quarter (90 days) and remind them it is time to buy again. (If a site has a low volume and few conversions, this may be a tough strategy for some advertisers.)
  • Although I personally tend to bid low when starting a new Search campaign for clients, using RLSA is when it is time to increase those bids. This remarketing list consists of people interested in your products or services so when it comes time for them to continue researching, or searching again, on Google.com, you want to remind them of their past interest in you.
  • A recommended keyword strategy for Search campaigns is to have tight themes in each group that are targeted to the appropriate landing page. However, with RLSA, you may actually want to use broader keywords. This can keep your targeted audience from becoming too narrow.
  • The same remarketing rule of “Don’t Be Creepy” applies to Search just as much as Display. You don’t want to say “Finish buying our ____.” Not only will that feel like an invasion of privacy, it could result in some uncomfortable conversations in a household with multiple people using the same computer. A better strategy would be to make the offer based on assumptions about why the person did not complete a purchase. For example if they abandoned their cart at the time of shipping, a promo code for half off shipping can get their attention without feeling like an invasion of privacy.
  • Focus on engaged users. Perhaps your site is driven by content. The more time people spend on your website, the more likely the will see your affiliate ads. You can create ads for this group if they spent a certain amount of time on the site or visited a number of pages.
  • If you have an ecommerce site, you can engage some of your big spenders. Invite them to come back and spend even more based on their purchasing habits and what they have bought from you previously. You may find a better ROI for your ad spend if you go after this group.

There are some limitations to RLSA. Some dimensions, such as age and gender, are not available because of privacy.  You also unfortunately can not use language, location, operating system, device or browser, but hopefully the above scenarios provide enough justification for giving RLSA a try.

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