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Archive of ‘Marketing Profile’ category

How Agile Marketing Boot Camp Helped One ASPE-ROI Client

The general term “agile marketing” has been a hot topic in marketing discussions around the world this year. Every company wants their marketing team to be agile, react quickly, and be more efficient. What isn’t as common is what the actualization is from formal Agile Marketing (capital because I’m talking about the actual methodology referred to by the Agile Marketing Manifesto) implementation.

In July, the marketing group from Northern Arizona University, Extended Campuses brought the Agile Marketing Boot Camp course to them. Instructors Jim Ewel and Keith Finger led them through two days of methodology and hands-on practice about Agile Marketing and how they could adapt it for their specific situations. I had a chance to ask the Extended Campuses Director of Marketing Ann-Marie deWees a few questions about what she and her team thought about the training. Below are a few answers to those questions.

Why did you want to take the course?

I was intrigued by agile and wanted to go deeper, with the guidance of an instructor. (more…)

Leadership & Internet Marketing: A Personal Journey Continues

I continued my journey to earn my Executive Certificate in Internet Marketing – the only university-recognized professional certificate program of its kind through a partnership between ASPE-ROI and Saint Louis University’s AACSB accredited John Cook School of Business – and attended a virtual session of Social Media Boot Camp, which took place via WebEx and was taught by Bobby McDonald (@bobbymcdonald), a social media strategist.

The course attracted four of us, and although it was smaller than average given that August is a big vacation month, it allowed extra time for engagement and interaction with each other and the instructor. A diverse group of professionals, we were not only able to connect from locations throughout the country –including Philadelphia, Denver, New York City, Charlotte and Raleigh –but able to bring unique perspectives to social media through completely different lenses. We represented different industries – a solutions provider of columns for chromatography scientists, a nonprofit association, a recruiting / philanthropy firm and a marketing consultancy.  We also have varied functions in our respected organizations from marketing and program administration to human resources and executive management. (more…)

Digital Skills in a 21st Century Marketing Career

The Importance of Continuing Education for Adult Professionals

I am both a consumer and a provider in the field of adult continuing education. I began my career in marketing 25 years ago, when “direct mail” still meant paper, and “list” meant US postal service addresses. I have both a technical degree (I started out as a programmer) and an MBA, but when I decided to re-enter the workforce after time spent away from my career raising children, it quickly became clear I wasn’t in Kansas anymore. I urgently needed to update my marketing skills.

In a recent AdWeek Q&A column, 24 Seven founder and CEO Celeste Gudas talked about the need for current marketing skills, and provided a recruiter’s view about the job market in the digital and advertising sector. In it, she says that for advertising/marketing professionals, digital skills are a must, and that digital jobs are outpacing all others in the marketing field.

So I turned to the University of Washington in my hometown of Seattle, and sought out the most efficient means to bring my professional skills up to par. I enrolled in an adult continuing education certificate program: a three quarter, classroom-based, evening program geared toward working professionals called the “Certificate In Social Media Technologies and Implementation.” (more…)

Marketing Hiring: A discussion between Dan London & JT Moore

I recently had Dan London, Senior Marketing Manager at Citrix/ShareFile, in the office to shoot a video as part of my Marketer Profile blog series. It’s always a pleasure to have Dan around because despite our very different companies, we share a lot of the same opinions and visions about the future of marketing. We probably talked for an hour about our challenges, what’s working and what’s not, the future of our profession, the meaning of life, etc. before shooting his interview video, and we both realized afterwards that we should of had the camera rolling.

So, after his interview, Dan suggested we just hit record and talk. There was no set topic or plan…just two marketers talking. He decided for us to talk about hiring marketers today and what we both see. The video below is the discussion.

If you enjoy the video, let us know. Dan and I are both somewhat quiet and reserved, but in this kind of situation we can talk for days. We’ll do this again if people like it.

Marketer Profile: Dan London, Senior Marketing Manager at Citrix/ShareFile

How long at ShareFile?  

I’ve been at ShareFile for almost 3 years.

 

Career accomplishment you’re most proud of:

Being a major part of a company that was acquired by Citrix.

 

Decision I wish I could do over:

Career-wise, it was not sticking with Computer Science as a major. I ended up switching to English after transferring to UNC-Chapel Hill from a small college in Pennsylvania. Life-wise it has to be not spending more time in the gym lifting weights and taking a shot at playing in the ECHL.

 


Size of team:

I have 3 direct reports, but I rely upon the design team as well as the content team and the support team quite a bit. We are actually growing pretty fast and I’ll be adding a few more reports by the end of the year.

 

Top initiative:

Hit our aggressive revenue goals.

 

What is a typical day like for you?

I don’t think I have a typical day. My mornings start out the same though. I get my kids ready for the day and then head off to Starbucks. My wife and I grab a quick drink then head off to our respective offices. I get in around 8 AM and usually start looking at the marketing numbers. We have an awesome data analyst who has created a dashboard that lets me easily track our goals. I usually check on my team and then dive into my DART account and look at the health of our display initiatives. I’ve done a decent job at avoiding meetings, but if I have one during the day, I usually spend some time preparing for it. I spend quite a bit of time working with our design and IT teams and often interact with them a few times a day about landing pages, creatives or trade show materials. I often skip lunch and just eat a bag of chips from the break-room, but if I can get out for a bit, I head over to the Jimmy John’s drive-thru, grab a Slim 1 and eat it as I drive back to the office. I try to leave the office around 5 to get home to spend time with my kids before they go to bed at 7pm. I always jump back on my computer and finish-up any lingering work for a couple of hours. I’m always checking my email on my phone, so I never have a problem of an overflowing inbox. Even on vacation I check my mail so I know what is going on and even jump into a conversation when needed.

 

How do you measure success:

Happiness. All the money in the world doesn’t matter if you are miserable at work.

 

One thing you’d like to do better:

Eat healthier at lunch.

 

Business professional you’d most like to have lunch with:

Gary Bettman, Commissioner of the NHL

 

Emerging trend you are most interested in:

Workshifting.

 

Pet peeve:

People who are self-proclaimed SEO or social media experts.

 

If I weren’t a marketer, I would be…

Hockey coach.

 

Marketer Profile: Chris Moody, Senior Marketing Manager at Red Hat

How long at Red Hat?

I joined Red Hat in December of 2011. Before that I was the Senior Marketing Manager for Phonebooth, part of Bandwidth.com.

 

Career accomplishment you’re most proud of:

I’ve been fortunate enough to bring several successful products to market, but the launch of Phonebooth has been the biggest yet. We had a variant of our product that was due to release and we needed to make a major splash at SXSW with tons of competition. Our plan and execution allowed us to attract over 10,000 SMBs to our product in less than four months. It was named the third best launch at SXSW behind Twitter and Foursquare.

 

Decision I wish I could do over:

I wish I would have been more involved in marketing from an early age. In college, I focused on getting my work done, doing some web design to pay the bills and graduating as soon as possible. If I went back to do it again, I would have offered to work for free at several targeted companies to broaden my experience and network as quickly as possible. My advice to young marketers is to put yourself out there before you have more financial burdens. If you’re fortunate enough to not have to work a full-time job, use your free time to sharpen your skills and make yourself more marketable.

 

 

Size of team:

Currently, our marketing team consists of 4 folks (soon to be 6) within the Cloud Business Unit at Red Hat.

 

Top initiative:

Launching a new cloud product.

 

What is a typical day like for you?

Several conference calls and meetings, time spent on creating and improving content, working with vendors and partners to push things forward, planning and scheduling, and any other general fire fighting.

 

How do you measure success:

Share of voice is a big thing we’re focusing on as we’re in a market niche with a lot of noise. We want people to know who we are and what sets our solutions apart. Additionally, we’re focused on bringing in new business (as everyone should be). Personally, I measure my success as never being comfortable. Red Hat is a fast moving and collaborative culture,and it really helps facilitate personal growth and development. There are opportunities to make an impact and stretch yourself past your comfort zone to do great things. I believe that is really important. If you aren’t challenged in your work, you aren’t growing or further developing your skills.

 

One thing you’d like to do better:

Focus. It’s easy to get sucked in by emails, calls or other diversions when it isn’t always the most important thing to focus on. I continue to work at getting better at saying no and spending time where it adds the most value.

 

Business professional you’d most like to have lunch with:

Mark Cuban. He’s worked really hard to get to where he is without ever losing himself. I’m also thoroughly impressed by his ability to make quick and precise decisions. Shark Tank is a popular show in our home and Mark Cuban always seems to be the first to put his finger on the pulse of the issue or driver of any potential investment decision. Having that laser-like focus is really fun to see. I’m also a huge basketball fan, so that would be cool to chat about too.

 

Emerging trend you are most interested in:

Marketing measurement. There are some things as marketers that we know we must do. Some that we have to do. Others that we file in an experimental category. But, it is extremely important to know how to frame any decision or what you’re working on to show success. This isn’t always dollars, as it could be a decision that simply improves company perception (which could drive more leads and more dollars). It is alarming that many marketers aren’t able to take a project, campaign or initiative and structure it in a way to report on its success after a given period of time. I wouldn’t say it is an emerging trend, but one that it really important for any marketer. Great marketing will only get you so far if you can’t present what you’re doing to a C-level executive.

 

Pet peeve:

That many marketers can’t measure their success, and that many view social media as a new thing on its own island. Social media is a set of tools that allows marketers to do the things they’ve always done in new places – communicate. It is much easier to do this, but it isn’t new at all. It also fits into larger business and marketing objectives. We have to get away from the silo approach and figure out how everything fits together to make our businesses better.

 

If I weren’t a marketer, I would be…

An entrepreneur / work at home dad. Having an 8 month old has given me lots of perspective about what is important, and I’d love to spend even more time at home. I’m really passionate about bringing new ideas and products to market and would probably try to do more of that if I wasn’t a professional marketer. I was very close to being both an architect or a teacher at different points in time, but everything led me back to marketing. It’s in my DNA I guess. I ran a Nintendo game rental business when I was 5 years old and even came up with special bundled deals to rent more games… I guess I ended up in the right field.

 

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